Sun and Water Go Together Well — for Solar-Powered Water Treatment Plants, That Is

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More water treatment plants are going solar, and many are powered by Suniva, an American solar manufacturer. One of the latest is bringing more solar power to the Sunshine State.

Going solar is all the rage for landfills and water treatment plants. It makes sense — solar is saving money for all kinds of operations, and these in particular tend to have a lot of space for installations.

Solar manufacturer Suniva, Inc., based in Atlanta, has been providing materials for a number of the water treatment plants going solar. Today, the company announced that it’s powering Florida’s first-of-its-kind solar-powered water treatment plant. That’s good news for a state that hasn’t lived up to its Sunshine State moniker, when it comes to solar power.

The city of Coleman, Florida, together with engineering firm Mittauer and Associates, general contractor ECO-2000 Inc., solar installer JSG Solar, and module manufacturer Suniva will celebrate the the new solar-powered water treatment center with a public ribbon-cutting ceremony on Monday, June 16.

“The city of Coleman is very fortunate to have such innovative leaders. The talented team applied for and received renewable energy grant money for this energy saving solar power system. This system is the first of its kind in the state, making it a poster child for Florida – one of the sunniest states in our nation,” said Jerry Guthmiller, president, JSG Solar, Inc. “It was my pleasure working with the City and from my experience working with Suniva, I knew Suniva’s high-powered OPTimus modules would be the best fit for this installation.”

“Suniva is proud to be a part of this unique installation in Florida,” said Matt Card, vice president global sales and marketing, Suniva. “We’ve seen a real uptick in the amount of solar powered water treatment and waste water treatment facilities. We’re happy to see that municipalities of all sizes are recognizing the value of renewable energy. Forward-thinking cities like Coleman are showing all of us how to be responsible citizens – economically and environmentally.”