Forever 21 Furthers LA FIT with Largest Single-Rooftop Solar Installation in the City

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Forever 21 becomes the latest business to participate in the Los Angeles feed-in tariff program. The company’s planned 1.5 MW rooftop solar installation will be the largest single-rooftop solar power system in Los Angeles County and the third-largest in California.

The Los Angeles rooftop solar feed-in tariff (FIT) has already been hailed as a resounding success. And while it’s reportedly delivering on its promise to bring cost-effective, clean power to tens of thousands of Los Angelenos, many think the program could do even more.

That apparently includes clothing retailer Forever 21, the latest business to participate in the LA FIT program. The company recently unveiled plans to install a 5.1 MW (DC) high-efficiency SunPower solar PV system at its headquarters in LA’s Lincoln Heights neighborhood. The system will be the largest single-rooftop solar power system in Los Angeles County and the third-largest in California.

 

It will also become the first project to use both of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) local solar programs — the FiT100 Set Pricing Program and the Solar Incentive Program — at one location.

 

“We applaud Forever 21 for planning the largest solar rooftop system in the city and the third largest in the state. It’s a great example of how a business can use both of LADWP’s customer-focused, local solar programs to generate solar power for their own use as well as to benefit the entire city with clean renewable energy,” said Marcie Edwards, LADWP general manager.

 

Solar provider PermaCity is designing the system, which it will install using its locally made SolarStrap racking product. Manufactured in Los Angeles, SolarStrap does not create exposed penetrations that can cause roof leaks, and does not rely on bulky ballast that can stress a building’s structural integrity.

 

When completed this summer, the system is expected to generate enough energy to power approximately 1,450 Lincoln Heights homes. It’s estimated that it will offset almost 13 million pounds of CO2, the equivalent of burning 6 million pounds of coal. That’s like taking 1,200 passenger cars off the roads.